MCP: Scenario 1

Making connections between procedures
Scenario: Christiana teaching division by multiples of ten Country: Cyprus Grade (student age): Year 5 (age 10-11) Contributed by: Marilena Petrou Context – national, curricular, professional, other Christiana was a final year university student in a 4 year teacher prapeartion programme. To become a teacher in Cyprus you take part in a 4 year university degree in elementary education. Students are trained to teach all subjects and with the completion of the programme they are considered qualified teachers. During the last year of the progrmme students choose an area of specilisation and take part in a school based teaching experience.  Christiana was in her last years of her training and she chose to specialise in mathematics. Mathematics was one of her favourite subjects and she had a very positive attitude…
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MCP: Scenario 2

Making connections between procedures
Scenario: Jess teaching about the relationship between multiplication and division within the context of a lesson about solving word problems Country: UK Grade (student age): Year 5 (age 9-10) Contributed by: Fay Turner, University of Cambridge, UK Context – national, curricular, professional, other Jess had completed a one year graduate teacher programme the previous year.  The lesson took place in the second term of her first year of teaching.  The curriculum guidance for England at this time (2006) gave an objective that stated pupils in year 5 should ‘understand the effect of and relationship between the four operations, and the principles (not the names) of the arithmetic laws as they apply to multiplication’.  The main objective for this lesson was ‘Choose and use appropriate number operations and appropriate ways of…
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MCP: Scenario 3

Making connections between procedures
Scenario: Lucy teaching trigonometric ratios Country: UK Grade (student age): Year 10 (age 14-15) Contributed by: Anne Thwaites, University of Cambridge, UK Context – national, curricular, professional, other The National Curriculum for mathematics in England introduces trigonometric relationships in Key Stage 4 (years 10 and 11, pupil age 14-16). Lucy was reviewing the idea of a trigonometric ratio with her class, before moving on to discuss how to calculate the size of an angle given the lengths of two sides. Lucy was a graduate pre-service teacher, and the lesson took place in a school-based placement towards the end of her one-year teacher preparation. Scenario Lucy, a graduate student-teacher, was teaching in an open-entry school (pupil age 11-18) in a small town in the UK. The school divides each year into…
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